WWF

China Announces It Will Shut Down Its Domestic Commercial Elephant Ivory Trade in 2017

China Announces It Will Shut Down Its Domestic Commercial Elephant Ivory Trade in 2017

The following statement was released today by the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Asia Executive Director Aili Kang: “China has announced today that it will close its domestic commercial elephant ivory trade in 2017.  President Xi Jinping announced last year that China would take this action and now we have a timeline.

Going into Business for Wildlife Conservation

Stalking jaguar in Pantanal, Brazil. (Photo by Gautam Shah)

According to World Wildlife Fund, the rapid loss of wildlife species today is estimated to be up to 10,000 times higher than the natural extinction rate. We are watching them disappear on a daily basis. It is astounding.

Norway's wolf cull pits sheep farmers against conservationists

Norway has a population of just 68 wolves and conservationists say most off the injuries to sheep are caused by roaming wolves from Swedish packs. Photograph: Roger Strandli Brendhagen

Conservation groups worldwide were astonished to hear of the recent,unprecedented decision to destroy 70% of the Norway’s tiny and endangered population of 68 wolves, the biggest cull for almost a century.But not everyone in Norway is behind the plan. The wildlife protection group Predator Alliance Norway, for example, has campaign posters that talk of wolves as essential for nature, and a tourist attraction for Norway.

Case Study: ANNE WRIGHT

ANNE WRIGHT Recipient of Lifetime Service Awards, 2013 - Assam & North Bengal

Anne Wright was born the daughter of British ICS Ocer and she spent her childhood in the forests of Central India. She is also the founder trustee of World Wildlife fund for Nature – India, which she helped setup in the late 1960s. She was appointed by the late Prime Minister Indira Gandhi as a member of the Tiger Task Force for Project Tiger in 1970. She then served for 19 years on the Indian Board for Wildlife and was closely involved with the passing of the Wildlife Protection Act.

Case Study: DR. ANWARUDDIN CHOUDHURY

Dr. Anwaruddin, releasing the book on 'Mammals of India', in collaboration with Balipara Foundation

Dr. Anwaruddin Choudhury is an ornithologist, mammologist, artist, civil servant, photographer and an author of several books on wildlife, notably known for writing a book on ‘Mammals of India’ in 2016. Dr. Choudhury received his Bachelor of Arts degree with Honours in Geography from B. Borooah College, Guwahati in 1981. He then went on to Guwahati University to obtain his Master of Arts Degree in Geography in 1985. He obtained his Ph.D.

Young Naturalist Award for Sikkim Designer Omi Gurung

Young Naturalist Award for Sikkim Designer Omi Gurung

Sikkim fashion designer Omi Gurung, received the Young Naturalist Award 2016. The award was conferred to him for his contribution towards, sustainable development and creating green eco-friendly fashion. The award was presented at the Eastern Himalayan Naturenomics Forum 2016 hosted by the 4th Balipara Foundation.

Last rhino dies at sanctuary

Rhino translocation to Burachapori wildlife sanctuary in Sonitpur district of Assam has ended in a disaster with the death of its second rhino today. There are no rhinos at Burachapori wildlife sanctuary now. Two female rhinos, a mother and its calf, were translocated from Kaziranga National Park on March 29 to mark a new beginning in the history of Burachapori wildlife sanctuary. In the early 1980s, the sanctuary had more than 70 rhinos.

World on track to lose two-thirds of wild animals by 2020, major report warns

A victim of poachers in Kenya: elephants are among the species most impacted by humans, the WWF report found. Photograph: imageBROKER/REX/Shutterstock

Living Planet Index shows vertebrate populations are set to decline by 67% on 1970 levels unless urgent action is taken to reduce humanity’s impact The number of wild animals living on Earth is set to fall by two-thirds by 2020, according to a new report, part of a mass extinction that is destroying the natural world upon which humanity depends. The analysis, the most comprehensive to date, indicates that animal populations plummeted by 58% between 1970 and 2012, with losses on track to reach 67% by 2020.

Pages

Back to Top

For the latest in the Eastern Himalayas

Latest Event

1st Regional Eastern Himalayan Naturenomics™ Forum 2019