Naturenomics Publication

The League of Earth Heroes

Presenting Balipara Foundation Social Recognition Award Winners 2013 – 2018

The Himalayan - A Naturenomics™ Publication

The Himalayan - A Naturenomics™ Publication

The distinctive richness of the Eastern Himalayas can be attributed to its colorful biodiversity, numerous niche ecosystems, and vibrant communities. Understanding the dynamics, structure, and functioning of these systems adds an enormous complexity to not only their conservation and restoration, but also in engaging stakeholders and nding innovative long-term solutions.

Naturenomics™ 6.0 (2016)

Naturenomics™ 6.0

The Eastern Himalayas represent a very unique ecology. There is a very wide variation in the flora and fauna in the Himalayan zone because of the very steep ascent in the terrain in a very short distance.One moves from the sub-tropical to the temperate to icy desert in a very short spatial distance and this has spawned a very rich and rare bio-diversity which is a veritable ecological treasure house.

Lessons to be learnt from Emperor Ashoka and Kautilya Asian Elephant Secretariat launched today

The two day Eastern Himalayan Naturenomics Forum organised by the Balipara Foundation had started on 8th November in the College of Veterinary Science at Khanapara wherein discussions, presentations and plenary sessions were held behind the backdrop of the critical biodiversity the Eastern Himalayas. The College of Veterinary Sessions was moderated by Dr. R. N. Goswami, Dean, College of Veterinary Science, Assam Agricultural University and in his welcome address Dr. Goswami stressed on habitat protection over specific species protection and laid concern in the lack of veterinary experts in forest department. Mr Ranjit Barthakur, Founder Trustee, Baliapra Foundation and the Architect of Naturenomics Model in his address highlighted the primary aims and objectives of the forum – nurturing the biodiversity of the Eastern Himalayas of which Notrth Eastern region is a major part and honouring the eco-champions of the year.

KAZIRANGA – Our Natural Inheritance

Kaziranga and the great Indian one-horned rhinoceros are synonymous. The very name ‘Kaziranga’ inspires awe, pride and deep respect in the minds and hearts of the Assamese people. This floodplain is a child of the Brahmaputra river. Here Rhinoceros unicornis is making its last stand in a mosaic of incredible ecosystems that fall in the Indomalayan Realm.

The book traces the conservation history of the Park. It also highlights the threats faced by the rhino today and reminds us of those who lived and died to protect the wild beauty of Kaziranga. In Kaziranga, you can hear the trumpet of elephants, the call of the hoolock gibbon, and the display of amorous Bengal Floricans.

The more adventurous could sight graceful Gangetic river dolphins and, with some luck, the secretive tiger, in what is believed to be the most densely populated tiger habitat in the world. Kaziranga is home to all these and more, including the Asiatic wild buffalo, swamp deer, sambar, hog deer and over 500 species of birds. The Kaziranga Inheritance is a photographic tribute to this wildlife haven and the people who have battled for its survival. Showcasing some of the most stunning images of the biodiversity of Northeast India, this visual portfolio transports you to a long-ago world of immeasurable worth.

KAZIRANGA – Our Natural Inheritance - A Case Study Of A Success Story

Milestones of Kaziranga
1905 – Preliminary notification of Kaziranga as Reserve Forest.
1908 – Kaziranga declared as Reserve Forest.
1916 – Kaziranga Reserve declared as Game Sanctuary.
1937 – Sanctuary opened for visitors.
1950 – Kaziranga Game Sanctuary was named as Kaziranga Wildlife Sanctuary
1974 – Declaration of sanctuary as Kaziranga National Park
1985 – Park was inscribed as World Heritage Site by UNESCO-IUCN
2005 – The year 2005 was centenary year of successful biodiversity conservation of the Kaziranga National Park.

An overriding concern affects the future of Kaziranga, and all of India’s wildernesses – will the flash, glitter and endless demands for ‘development’ allow places like Kaziranga to survive for another century and beyond?

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