Nature Conservancy

Poverty endangers the Hilsa in Bangladesh

A fisherman’s wife on the doorstep on poverty in Bangladesh [image by Zobaidur Rahman

Selim Miah went to the Meghna river to catch fish with his father when he was nine years old. Now, 41 years later, he is still fighting to make ends meet.

“We are struggling to find food to survive; not just for a few days or nights, we struggle day after day. Being a fisherman is a curse!” Selim Miah told thethirdpole.net.

All-Women 'Army' Protecting Rare Bird in India

Greater adjutant storks stand near a garbage dump on the outskirts of Gauhati, India, on June 5, 2012.  PHOTOGRAPH BY ANUPAM NATH, AP

DADARA, INDIAOn a cloudy day in July, in a remote village in northeastern India, Charu Das excitedly imitates the awkward movements of a stork with her hands.

In a few months, the greater adjutant stork—called hargilla, which means "swallower of bones" in Sanskrit—will descend on this hamlet, situated in Assam's Brahmaputra Valley, to breed in large numbers.

"You will soon catch sight of this dark, quirky-looking bird, with large, thick bills, stalking over the beds of these wetlands or on the rain-soaked paddy fields in its typical military gait," Das says.

The Four Biggest Hazards Facing Monarch Butterflies, and How You Can Help

Monarch butterfly.
Look close, those aren’t leaves or flowers. These trees are packed with monarch butterflies.
A Monarch butterfly caterpillar feeding on the leaves of a milkweed plant. Photographed at the Grapevine Botanical Gardens.
A Monarch butterfly caterpillar feeding on the leaves of a milkweed plant. Photographed at the Grapevine Botanical Gardens.

Monarch butterflies are in the media a lot lately, and it’s not good news. What’s really going on? Are the butterflies facing extinction? Our blogger breaks down the issue, including how you can make a difference.

Twenty years ago, monarch butterflies occupied so much area in Mexico during the winter you could see it from space. It totaled about 20 hectares, or almost 50 acres, with millions if not billions of butterflies clinging to trunks and branches of trees.

How landscapes can help solve climate change - By Nature Conservancy

As part of our efforts to support a strong international climate agreement at COP21 in Paris, The Nature Conservancy is working hard to ensure that the agreement accelerates land use sector investments that mitigate climate change and establishes a scientifically robust accounting system to verify results and enhance confidence in the sector.

Case Study: JADHAV PAYENG

JADHAV PAYENG receiving the Ecological Restoration Awards, 2013 - Assam

Jadhav ‘Mulai’ Payeng belongs to the ‘Mishing’ tribe (one of the largest ethnic groups of Assam). He used to live in the forest ‘Mulai Kathoni’ at Aruna Chapori, with his wife and three children where his only source of income was selling milk. (He recently moved to his ancestral village in Jorhat District for the sake of his children’s education). ‘Mulai Kathoni’ - the name of the forest was given by the Government of Assam, and it is called rightly as he was the one who helped in creating it.

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