Man-Elephant Conflict

Common Grounds (An Interactive Cultural Event Addressing Man - Animal Conflict)

Common Grounds  (An Interactive Cultural Event Addressing Man - Animal Conflict)
  1. Date of event: 20th July 2019

  2. Time: 5pm-7.30pm

  3. Location: The Maati Centre, Uzanbazar, Guwahati

  4. Footfall: 60+ people

EHNF 2018 Rural Futures: Lisa Mills, University of Montana on Asian Elephant Conservation

EHNF 2018 Rural Futures: Lisa Mills, University of Montana on Asian Elephant Conservation
EHNF 2018 Rural Futures: Lisa Mills, University of Montana on Asian Elephant Conservation

A village where men, elephants coexist peacefully

A village where men, elephants coexist peacefully
A village where men, elephants coexist peacefully

Even as the man-elephant conflict rages across the State, a village near the Bhutiachang tea estate in Udalguri district has shown that it is not quite impossible to maintain a ‘peaceful coexistence’ with elephants. The No. 4 Bhutiachang village which has been frequented by elephant herds for decades with the debilitating consequences of human fatalities and crop loss, has evolved an innovative approach that is visibly easing the tension between man and animal for the past couple of years.

Elephas Maximus vs Homo Sapien

Dr. Khyne U Mar, John Roberts and Belinda Stewart Cox share their thoughts on captive elephants at EHNF

The history of the world is replete with names of illustrious members of the Asian Elephant or Elephas Maximus family such as -

Kumki elephants to be deployed to capture rogue

Kumki arrives to capture rogue elephant

Kumki (tamed) elephants are being roped in by authorities to capture a rogue elephant, which has been creating havoc in Madukkarai area on the city outskirts for the last one year. Coimbatore District Collector Archana Patnaik today convened a meeting to discuss the strategy to capture and translocate the rogue elephant.

Threats to Wild Elephants

No room to roam:

The greatest threat to wild Asian elephants is habitat loss and fragmentation. Throughout the tropics, humans have cleared large areas of forest and have rapidly populated river valleys and plains. Elephants have been pushed into hilly landscapes and less suitable remnants of forest, but even these less accessible habitats are being assaulted by poachers, loggers, and developers.

Threats to Domestic Elephants

For thousands of years the elephant was part of the fabric of daily life in Asia. They served primarily to transport goods and people. When the 20th century began, elephants were put to use by the timber industry, destroying their own habitat in the process.

 Except in less-developed Myanmar, the need for elephant labor has steadily declined since World War II, and so has the domesticated Asian elephant population.

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Common Grounds  (An Interactive Cultural Event Addressing Man - Animal Conflict)