Local Tribe

How Big Banks Are Putting Rain Forests in Peril

Young orphaned orangutans on a climbing expedition with their keeper at International Animal Rescue’s orangutan school in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Credit Kemal Jufri for The New York Times

In early 2015, scientists monitoring satellite images at Global Forest Watch raised the alarm about the destruction of rain forests in Indonesia. Environmental groups raced to the scene in West Kalimantan province, on the island of Borneo, to find a charred wasteland: smoldering fires, orangutans driven from their nests, and signs of an extensive release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. “There was pretty much no forest left,” said Karmele Llano Sánchez, director of the nonprofit International Animal Rescue’s orangutan rescue group, which set out to save the endangered primates. “All the forest had burned.”

Culling wild animals isn't part of the Indian ethos – we can do better to avoid conflict

Culling wild animals isn't part of the Indian ethos – we can do better to avoid conflict

Policy decisions in wildlife are rarely rooted in science and are often a result of political processes. In countries like Norway and North America, with their high quality and quantity of wildlife science, hunting of wild animals is culturally acceptable and carried out for harvesting meat, recreation, tradition and empowerment of rural communities. Culling is also carried out in response to human-wildlife conflict, despite lack of evidence of its efficacy.

A village where men, elephants coexist peacefully

A village where men, elephants coexist peacefully
A village where men, elephants coexist peacefully

Even as the man-elephant conflict rages across the State, a village near the Bhutiachang tea estate in Udalguri district has shown that it is not quite impossible to maintain a ‘peaceful coexistence’ with elephants. The No. 4 Bhutiachang village which has been frequented by elephant herds for decades with the debilitating consequences of human fatalities and crop loss, has evolved an innovative approach that is visibly easing the tension between man and animal for the past couple of years.

A day in a Garo village by Balipara Foundation Team

Balipara Foundation team with the ladies of Garo Gaon

On 4th of December 2016, Mr. Ranjit Barthakur along with the BTFF team members experienced a village life of three tribal communities which are Garo, Nissi, and Bodo tribe. The team was first guided to Sengelimari Garo Gaon by Mrs. Eliza Boro, a member of Mahila Shakti Kendra and owner of Saneki at NaturenomicsTM Bazaar. There they met Mrs. Sushila Sangma, widow of a late army officer. The team explored her home garden where they found a large variety of trees including orange, black pepper, pineapple etc.

Case Study: APARAJITA DATTA

APARAJITA DATTA Recipient of Wildlife Conservation Awards, 2014 - Arunachal Pradesh

The driving force behind Aparajita’s eorts towards wildlife conservation and community development are the Lisu people itself, who have inhabited and lived in the lands long before any ‘National Park’ or ‘Tiger Reserve’ was created.

Case study: BINOD BORA

Binod Bora Recipient of Conservation Through Innovation Awards, 2014 - Assam

Binod ‘Dulu’ Bora is a key member of the Green Guards Nataure Organization in Assam and he has dedicated his life towards wildlife conservation and rescue of wild animals from illegal trade. Bora specializes on human-wildlife conict matters in Assam, especially the ones involving Asian elephant conict mitigation and managing of straying leopards. His organization works on mitigation plans to deal with human and elephant deaths caused during interactions in the Nagaon-Karbi Anglong landscape.

Case Study: TANA TAPI, TAKUM NABUM AND THE GHORA AABHE SOCIETY

TANA TAPI, TAKUM NABUM AND THE GHORA AABHE SOCIETY  Recipient of Habitat Conservation Awards, 2014 - Arunachal Pradesh

The Ghora Aabhe Society consists of reformed hunters and conservationists living in and around Pakke Tiger Reserve, who have become the guardians of wildlife in this landscape. Situated in the state of Arunachal Pradesh, members of the society are known for carrying out ground-level conservation work with communities and governing agencies towards the awareness and conservation of biodiversity. Two of the key people from the society are Tana Tapi and Takum Nabum.

Case Study: BANO HARALU

BANO HARALU Recipient of Young Entrepreneur Awards, 2014 - Nagaland

Bano Haralu is a retired and revolutionary television journalist with an experience of more than two decades in Doordarshan and NDTV. She then begin her pursuit to promote wildlife conservation in and around India. She has been involved in working towards conservation in Nagaland since 2010. And she has been instrumental in raising awareness for the Amur Falcons that were being hunted at an alarming rate by the local community in the state of Nagaland.

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