fbpx Habitat loss | Page 3 | Balipara Foundation

Habitat loss

Could we set aside half the Earth for nature?

A bald uakari monkey (Cacajao calvus) in the flooded forest of the Amazon in Brazil. The IUCN Red List categorizes this species as vulnerable. Photograph: Alamy

As of today, the only place in the universe where we are certain life exists is on our little home, the third planet from the sun. But also as of today, species on Earth are winking out at rates likely not seen since the demise of the dinosaurs. If we don’t change our ways, we will witness a mass extinction event that will not only leave our world a far more boring and lonely place, but will undercut the very survival of our species. So, what do we do? E.O. Wilson, one of the world’s most respected biologists, has proposed a radical, wild and challenging idea to our species: set aside half of the planet as nature preserves.

Poverty endangers the Hilsa in Bangladesh

A fisherman’s wife on the doorstep on poverty in Bangladesh [image by Zobaidur Rahman

Selim Miah went to the Meghna river to catch fish with his father when he was nine years old. Now, 41 years later, he is still fighting to make ends meet.

“We are struggling to find food to survive; not just for a few days or nights, we struggle day after day. Being a fisherman is a curse!” Selim Miah told thethirdpole.net.

Flood fury: Why Brahmaputra’s trail of destruction has become annual ritual in Assam

Only the Amazon carries more water than the Brahmaputra, one of the largest rivers in the world with an annual flow of about 573 billion cubic metres at Jogighopa, close to the Indo-Bangladesh border. (Source: Express photo by Dasarath Deka)

The villagers had been talking all morning. There was some water seeping through the embankment along the Brahmaputra, they said, so Ruparam Das, 52, a fisherman in Kaivartagaon, a village in the river island of Majuli, decided to check out for himself. Around 3 pm on July 26, as he stood in front of the river, a few metres downstream from his house, he heard a loud bang. The river had broken through the embankment, but not where he stood. Instead, the river had torn through the wall right in front of his house.

All-Women 'Army' Protecting Rare Bird in India

Greater adjutant storks stand near a garbage dump on the outskirts of Gauhati, India, on June 5, 2012.  PHOTOGRAPH BY ANUPAM NATH, AP

DADARA, INDIAOn a cloudy day in July, in a remote village in northeastern India, Charu Das excitedly imitates the awkward movements of a stork with her hands.

In a few months, the greater adjutant stork—called hargilla, which means "swallower of bones" in Sanskrit—will descend on this hamlet, situated in Assam's Brahmaputra Valley, to breed in large numbers.

"You will soon catch sight of this dark, quirky-looking bird, with large, thick bills, stalking over the beds of these wetlands or on the rain-soaked paddy fields in its typical military gait," Das says.

Biodiversity Conservation Coordination Meeting, Jun - 2016

Biodiversity Conservation Coordination Meeting, Jun - 2016, Assam

Biodiversity Conservation Coordination meeting held on Transboundary Manas Conservation Area (TraMCA) on 21st and 22nd Jun-2016 at IIBM, Khanapara Guwahati.

Organised by Aranyak, WWF and Govt of Bhutan and BTC, Assam.

Timber smuggling threatens Chakrasila existence

Stumps of trees at Nayekgaon forest range in Chakrasila wildlife sanctuary.
 Habitat loss puts golden langur population in jeopardy, forest department cites lack of manpower & resources

 

A tusk-less future for the Asian Elephant

Picture the Asian elephant without its elegant tusks. Ecological scientists filming the pachyderms for months together at the Kaziranga National Park in the north-east Indian state of Assam say this picture might become a reality in a few thousand years from now. The reasons, they figure, are two-fold. One, tusks are merely ornamental, not of much use to the animal and thus dispensable. And two, poaching pressures are rendering more and more elephants toothless.

Grass not green enough? Nameri tigers face threat of shrinking grasslands

Guwahati: Shrinking grasslands have become a cause of concern for the 344-sq km Nameri Tiger Reserve (NTR) in Sonitpur district. The latest assessment report on NTR's predator and prey status has revealed that it has lost nearly 50% of its grasslands between 1973 and 2011. 

Pages

Back to Top

For the latest in the Eastern Himalayas

Latest Event