Report for the Training Workshop on Bamboo Utilization

Workshop Report:

Aims:

  • To foster Rural Futures in the Eastern Himalayas.
  • To Create socio-economic and environment interdependence through the concept of Naturenomics™

  • To provide training to bamboo artisans and entrepreneurs.

  • To  raise awareness on sustainable livelihood through bamboo based activities and products in the region.

Trainer:

Sponsored by North-East Council, Balipara Foundation has collaborated with the Cane and Bamboo Technology Centre (CBTC) in the Northeast India, for a Bamboo Training Workshop to provide training to bamboo artisans and entrepreneurs and serve its purpose in raising awareness on sustainable livelihood through bamboo based activities and products in the region.

The training was organised by Balipara Foundation in the premises of Eastern Himalayan Botanic Ark which focuses on creating socio-economic and environment interdependence through the concept of Naturenomics. The Botanic Ark located in the Sonitpur district of Assam, India plays host to a rich sampling of Eastern Himalayan biodversity.

Introduction to training workshop:

Training workshop on Bamboo utilization was successfully held in the haven of Eastern Himalayan Botanic Ark during 6th February – 19th February 2018. There were 21 trainees from different backgrounds like daily wager, farmer, cook, student and a few unemployees around Sonitpur, attended the Bamboo training workshop. The participants came from Baligaon Miri Gaon, Gamani Gaon, Tarajan, 1 No. Phuluguri Garogaon, Eraliloga and Balipara Division Adabari T.E. These participants were carefully selected noticing their keen to learn on making of Bamboo products and engage in community development work.


Participants during workshop

Assam is rich in sylvan resources and most of its forests are richly stocked with bamboo and cane of various species. Bamboo is a raw material of great versatility and forms an integral part of the lifestyle and economy of Assam. North East Region stores 66% of India’s bamboo. Bamboo is cultivated in homesteads, village gardens, agricultural lands and field boundaries. In many states, farmers grow bamboo on marginal and degraded lands as well.

The training was organized in accordance with the climate and geographic features as well as to raise awareness on sustainable livelihood through bamboo based activities and products in the region. During the two week workshop training technologies on bamboo biology, bamboo propagation and management and bamboo utilization were transferred to trainees in both theoretical and practical way. The main contents of the training included bamboo morphology, bamboo flowering and bearing, bamboo propagation, bamboo seedling, bamboo afforestation, bamboo forest management, bamboo forest protection and bamboo processing and utilization.

Feedback from participants:

Total 40 bamboo handicrafts were made during the workshop by the participants. On the last day of the workshop a short reflection and wrap up session was held. Part of the session was used to gain feedback from the participants on the training, as well as to introduce them to the second workshop that will be held in September for the opening of bamboo school at EHBA premises. It was also a time for general discussions and networks.

The following was some of the feedbacks from the participants:

  • Several participants requested support for more planned Bamboo Construction Training workshop.

  • It was suggested that a short video be shown prior to doing the practical on site work so the participants could better understand the process they were learning and the steps involved in the making process.

  • One participants shared that he grew up around bamboo and worked with it his whole life but never understood the importance of utilization of bamboo handicrafts and its potential as a livelihood.

  • Many participants were curious about specific bamboo construction techniques (this will be covered in the next workshop in September)

  • The importance of establishing a close connection with growers and farmers to ensure the proper, sustainable production of bamboo was discussed.

Follow up and next steps:

  • Certificates will be later send to the participants at EHBA.

  • Bamboo handicrafts order will be given to the participated trainees by CBTC in collaboration to EHBA.

  • Visit to CBTC next month, they have a collection of 30 nos. of bamboo in their nursery. It may be possible to import few species of bamboo to EHBA for intensive cultivation.

Group Photographs with respective teams:


Team Tarajan

Team EHBA

Team Gamani

Good friend fits you like ring to finger

Team Garo

Team Mishing

 

Nature Video Highlight

The Eastern Himalayan Botanical Ark is a first of its kind in the Eastern Himalayas. The Ark seeks to become the centre for preservation and restoration of the biodiversity through education, experimentation and research.
The Eastern Himalayan Botanical Ark is a first of its kind in the Eastern Himalayas. The Ark seeks to become the centre for preservation and restoration of the biodiversity through education, experimentation and research.
Enamored by plant stories, captivated by the mysteries of their origin and etymology, and in a constant move to explore exotic plant species – Scott McMahan, Manager of International Plant Exploration Program, Atlanta Botanical Garden, is happy when referred to as a seed collector than a plant collector.
Enamored by plant stories, captivated by the mysteries of their origin and etymology, and in a constant move to explore exotic plant species – Scott McMahan, Manager of International Plant Exploration Program, Atlanta Botanical Garden, is happy when referred to as a seed collector than a plant collector.
Enamored by plant stories, captivated by the mysteries of their origin and etymology – Scott McMahan, Manager of International Plant Exploration Program, Atlanta Botanical Garden, is happy when referred to as a seed collector than a plant collector.
Enamored by plant stories, captivated by the mysteries of their origin and etymology – Scott McMahan, Manager of International Plant Exploration Program, Atlanta Botanical Garden, is happy when referred to as a seed collector than a plant collector.
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