Blue tigers from the Botanic Ark at Wild mahseer, Balipara

Blue tigers from the Botanic Ark at Wild mahseer, Balipara

The Blue Tiger (Tirumala limniace) is a butterfly found in India that belongs to the crows and tigers, that is, the danaid group of the brush-footed butterfly family. This butterfly shows gregarious migratory behaviour in southern India. Balipara Foundation these blue and beautiful tiger butterfly along with many other species of butterflies provide unique services in preserving botanical gardens.

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The Eastern Himalayan Botanical Ark is a first of its kind in the Eastern Himalayas. The Ark seeks to become the centre for preservation and restoration of the biodiversity through education, experimentation and research.
The Eastern Himalayan Botanical Ark is a first of its kind in the Eastern Himalayas. The Ark seeks to become the centre for preservation and restoration of the biodiversity through education, experimentation and research.
Enamored by plant stories, captivated by the mysteries of their origin and etymology, and in a constant move to explore exotic plant species – Scott McMahan, Manager of International Plant Exploration Program, Atlanta Botanical Garden, is happy when referred to as a seed collector than a plant collector.
Enamored by plant stories, captivated by the mysteries of their origin and etymology, and in a constant move to explore exotic plant species – Scott McMahan, Manager of International Plant Exploration Program, Atlanta Botanical Garden, is happy when referred to as a seed collector than a plant collector.
Enamored by plant stories, captivated by the mysteries of their origin and etymology – Scott McMahan, Manager of International Plant Exploration Program, Atlanta Botanical Garden, is happy when referred to as a seed collector than a plant collector.
Enamored by plant stories, captivated by the mysteries of their origin and etymology – Scott McMahan, Manager of International Plant Exploration Program, Atlanta Botanical Garden, is happy when referred to as a seed collector than a plant collector.
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