Water

How a 20th-century hunting boom left the Amazon with “empty rivers” and 23 million dead animals

Who could hurt this face?	(Reuters/Bruno Kelly)

The fashion for wild animal skins and furs drove a hunting boom in the Amazon basin through the 20th century. A mass industry sprung up almost overnight and the hides of otters, jaguars or alligator-like caimans were soon being shipped round the world to be turned into coats, hats or accessories. The Amazon rainforest, and the animals that live there, are still feeling the impact today.

Flood fury: Why Brahmaputra’s trail of destruction has become annual ritual in Assam

Only the Amazon carries more water than the Brahmaputra, one of the largest rivers in the world with an annual flow of about 573 billion cubic metres at Jogighopa, close to the Indo-Bangladesh border. (Source: Express photo by Dasarath Deka)

The villagers had been talking all morning. There was some water seeping through the embankment along the Brahmaputra, they said, so Ruparam Das, 52, a fisherman in Kaivartagaon, a village in the river island of Majuli, decided to check out for himself. Around 3 pm on July 26, as he stood in front of the river, a few metres downstream from his house, he heard a loud bang. The river had broken through the embankment, but not where he stood. Instead, the river had torn through the wall right in front of his house.

Brahmaputra leaves a desert behind

As the floodwaters of the Brahmaputra recede for now, farmers of Assam find their fields covered with sand on which they can grow nothing.

Eastern Himalayan Naturenomics™ Forum 2016

Eastern Himalayan Naturenomics™ Forum 2016

Successors & Inheritors of the Asian Elephants in the Wild & the Balipara Foundation Awards are proud to present the 2016 edition at Guwahati, Assam, India on 8th & 9th November 2016

First book on mammals out

Three decades of untiring and painstaking efforts of studying mammals has finally borne fruit. Wildlife conservationist Anwaruddin Choudhury has come out with a first-of-its-kind comprehensive book about mammals of India.

The book, Mammals of India, published by Balipara Foundation and released here today, is a major definitive work on the mammals of the country, where all the species have been mapped in colour with exhaustive details. The book has listed 430 species of mammals in the country.

How a 2 hectare forest in Bangalore’s heart has lowered temperature and raised its water table

The summer temperatures in Bangalore this year have been cause for particularly high concern among its residents, with some claiming that daytime temperature shot up to 41 degrees Celsius one day in April. This summer has surely felt hotter than most old Bangaloreans remember them ever being.

Sikkim restricts mineral water bottles in govt programmes

GANGTOK: For effective waste management in an eco-friendly manner, the Sikkim government has restricted the use of mineral water bottles in government programmes and banned the use of foam food containers all over the state.

In two recent notifications issued by the home department, the government said there has been rampant use of packaged drinking water during departmental meetings and functions which is creating a huge piles of garbage that adds to the burden of the landfill.

Victory for Nature, Loss to Fossil Fuel Era

It was a victory for Christina Figures the UN climate chief, for having accomplished nearly 200 nations sign the Climate Change agreement in end of fossil fuel era. Ranjit Barthakur, Founder Trustee had the privilege of presenting her the Water Book along with MR Ramaswamy the Founder of Corporate Eco Forum, in June 2015.

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