Threat

Pakke Paga Festival 2017

Pakke Paga Festival 2017

Eastern Himalayan Botanic Gardens #EHBA is proud to be associated with the first Pakke Paga festival in Arunachal Pradesh to recognise the role played by the local Nyishi tribe in conserving hornbills in Pakke and to tell the world about the wonders of the Pakke Tiger Reserve

Pakke poster

 

North East India: The unique biodiversity hotspot with rich avifauna

A Great Indian Hornbill at the Nagaland

The North Eastern (NE) region of the India is a biodiversity hotspot and represents one of the highest avian biodiversity of the Indian subcontinent. The region is ecologically represented by the Eastern Himalayan biome and is rich in a number of endemic flora and fauna. Several avian species inhabiting this unique ecosystem are not found or reported anywhere else in the world.

Case Study: Jayashree Naiding, IFS Assam

Ms.Jayashree Naiding was presented the Forest Guard Award by Smt. Mala Ramdorai

When a male rhino strayed into Tezpur town from Kaziranga National Park on June 26, 2016, it was under the leadership of Jayashree Naiding that it was driven back safely into the park. She led the staff and followed the rhino from Digali Chapori, Sri Lanka tapu and then back to Kaziranga. The following day when another rhino strayed into the Sootea area of Bebejia village, she showed exemplary spirit of leadership in coordinating with the police, CRPF, civil administration and NGOs to tranquilise the animal and taking it to the Guwahati state zoo. Ms.

Case Study: Ramen Das, ACF Assam

Sri Ramen Das was awarded the longest servicing Forest Guard  Award

Mr. Ramen Das is the longest-serving officer in Kaziranga National Park. When he served as the Range Officer Western Range, Bagori, it was because of his information network and intelligence base that several rhino poachers could be arrested. He recently led his team to Conoor in Tamil Nadu, arrested two accused in the poaching of a female rhino and her calf in Western Range Bagori and produced them before the Sub Divisional Judicial Magistrate, Kaliabor

Case Study: Deben Bora, Assam

Deben Bora was presented the Nature Conservancy Award by Dr Chandrashekar Hariharan,Balipara Foundation’s Gautam Baruah received the award on his behalf

After joining the Jakhalabandha Police Station as the officer-in-charge in 2014, Mr. Deben Bora have been on a single-minded mission to thwart rhino poaching attempts in the Kaziranga National Park.  Realising that the Burapahar and Bagari range were poaching hotspots, Mr. Bora developed effective mitigation measures relying on his experience.

Norway's wolf cull pits sheep farmers against conservationists

Norway has a population of just 68 wolves and conservationists say most off the injuries to sheep are caused by roaming wolves from Swedish packs. Photograph: Roger Strandli Brendhagen

Conservation groups worldwide were astonished to hear of the recent,unprecedented decision to destroy 70% of the Norway’s tiny and endangered population of 68 wolves, the biggest cull for almost a century.But not everyone in Norway is behind the plan. The wildlife protection group Predator Alliance Norway, for example, has campaign posters that talk of wolves as essential for nature, and a tourist attraction for Norway.

From loathed to loved: Villagers rally to save Greater Adjutant stork

Greater Adjutants in a nest at the Dadara village nesting colony in Assam, India. Photo by Purnima Barman
  • The Greater Adjutant stork (Leptoptilos dubius) could once be found from India to Southeast Asia in the hundreds of thousands. Long despised and treated as a pest, this giant, ungainly bird is Endangered by habitat lost, with just 1,000 remaining by the 1990s.

How Big Banks Are Putting Rain Forests in Peril

Young orphaned orangutans on a climbing expedition with their keeper at International Animal Rescue’s orangutan school in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Credit Kemal Jufri for The New York Times

In early 2015, scientists monitoring satellite images at Global Forest Watch raised the alarm about the destruction of rain forests in Indonesia. Environmental groups raced to the scene in West Kalimantan province, on the island of Borneo, to find a charred wasteland: smoldering fires, orangutans driven from their nests, and signs of an extensive release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. “There was pretty much no forest left,” said Karmele Llano Sánchez, director of the nonprofit International Animal Rescue’s orangutan rescue group, which set out to save the endangered primates. “All the forest had burned.”

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