Publications

Naturenomics™ 6.0 (2016)

Naturenomics series 6

The Eastern Himalayas represent a very unique ecology. There is a very wide variation in the flora and fauna in the Himalayan zone because of the very steep ascent in the terrain in a very short distance.One moves from the sub-tropical to the temperate to icy desert in a very short spatial distance and this has spawned a very rich and rare bio-diversity which is a veritable ecological treasure house.

Climate Change Impacts and Vulnerability in the Eastern Himalayas

Climate Change Impacts and Vulnerability in the Eastern Himalayas

Little is known in detail about the vulnerability of mountain ecosystems to climate change. Intuitively it seems plausible that these regions, where small changes in temperature can turn ice and snow to water, and where extreme slopes lead to rapid changes in climatic zones over small distances, will show marked impacts in terms of biodiversity, water availability, agriculture, and hazards that will have an impact on general human wellbeing.

Exploration and Discovery in the Last Shangri-La on Earth- Eastern Himalayas (Eastern Nepal, Bhutan & North East India)

The Himalaya – the abode of Gods, the land of snow, and the last Shangri La on Earth – is full of life. Designated as a global biodiversity hotspot, the region supports an extraordinarily high level of unique biodiversity. Being at the crossroads of historic and prehistoric trade routes and cultural diffusion, the Himalaya harbours hundreds of different ethnic communities and their associated languages and cultures, and its landscapes are sacred to several of the world’s major religions After the two poles, the Himalaya holds the highest amount of ice in its glaciers.

Reinventing prosperity

Reinventing prosperity

The biggest challenges facing the rich world today are persistent unemployment, widening income inequality, and accelerating climate change. Until now, most of the solutions to these problems have been politically unacceptable, in a world marked by short-termism and a desire for continuous economic growth. 

The studbook of timber elephants of Myanmar with special reference to survivorship analysis - Khyne U Mar

The purpose of the demographic analyses in this study was to calculate the basic life tables to determine the effects of the long-term captivity of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), which are utilized extensively as draught animals, on survival, fecundity and viability. The studbook data were collected from the elephant log books and the annual reports of the Extraction Department, Myanma Timber Enterprise of the Union of Myanmar. We had access to a near-total of the records (n (9600) of elephants captured or born after the year 1875, including 3 070 calving records. It was documented that 32.5 percent of calves born in captivity failed to reach the age of five years. Life table analysis revealed that most mortality occurred before the age of five. Survivorship analysis of adults and sub-adults (more than five years) showed that wild caught elephants and female elephants had significantly higher survival rates (P <0.001) than captive born and male elephants, respectively. A similar analysis was conducted for calves (under five years) and comparisons were made between dam origins and sex. It was revealed that calves born from wild caught (WC) dams had higher survival rates than those born from captive born (CB) dams (P <0.001), while survivorship and sex showed no correlation.

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