Poaching

Case Study: Jayashree Naiding, IFS Assam

Ms.Jayashree Naiding was presented the Forest Guard Award by Smt. Mala Ramdorai

When a male rhino strayed into Tezpur town from Kaziranga National Park on June 26, 2016, it was under the leadership of Jayashree Naiding that it was driven back safely into the park. She led the staff and followed the rhino from Digali Chapori, Sri Lanka tapu and then back to Kaziranga. The following day when another rhino strayed into the Sootea area of Bebejia village, she showed exemplary spirit of leadership in coordinating with the police, CRPF, civil administration and NGOs to tranquilise the animal and taking it to the Guwahati state zoo. Ms.

Case Study: Ramen Das, ACF Assam

Sri Ramen Das was awarded the longest servicing Forest Guard  Award

Mr. Ramen Das is the longest-serving officer in Kaziranga National Park. When he served as the Range Officer Western Range, Bagori, it was because of his information network and intelligence base that several rhino poachers could be arrested. He recently led his team to Conoor in Tamil Nadu, arrested two accused in the poaching of a female rhino and her calf in Western Range Bagori and produced them before the Sub Divisional Judicial Magistrate, Kaliabor

Case Study: Deben Bora, Assam

Deben Bora was presented the Nature Conservancy Award by Dr Chandrashekar Hariharan,Balipara Foundation’s Gautam Baruah received the award on his behalf

After joining the Jakhalabandha Police Station as the officer-in-charge in 2014, Mr. Deben Bora have been on a single-minded mission to thwart rhino poaching attempts in the Kaziranga National Park.  Realising that the Burapahar and Bagari range were poaching hotspots, Mr. Bora developed effective mitigation measures relying on his experience.

Norway's wolf cull pits sheep farmers against conservationists

Norway has a population of just 68 wolves and conservationists say most off the injuries to sheep are caused by roaming wolves from Swedish packs. Photograph: Roger Strandli Brendhagen

Conservation groups worldwide were astonished to hear of the recent,unprecedented decision to destroy 70% of the Norway’s tiny and endangered population of 68 wolves, the biggest cull for almost a century.But not everyone in Norway is behind the plan. The wildlife protection group Predator Alliance Norway, for example, has campaign posters that talk of wolves as essential for nature, and a tourist attraction for Norway.

Culling wild animals isn't part of the Indian ethos – we can do better to avoid conflict

Culling wild animals isn't part of the Indian ethos – we can do better to avoid conflict

Policy decisions in wildlife are rarely rooted in science and are often a result of political processes. In countries like Norway and North America, with their high quality and quantity of wildlife science, hunting of wild animals is culturally acceptable and carried out for harvesting meat, recreation, tradition and empowerment of rural communities. Culling is also carried out in response to human-wildlife conflict, despite lack of evidence of its efficacy.

A village where men, elephants coexist peacefully

A village where men, elephants coexist peacefully
A village where men, elephants coexist peacefully

Even as the man-elephant conflict rages across the State, a village near the Bhutiachang tea estate in Udalguri district has shown that it is not quite impossible to maintain a ‘peaceful coexistence’ with elephants. The No. 4 Bhutiachang village which has been frequented by elephant herds for decades with the debilitating consequences of human fatalities and crop loss, has evolved an innovative approach that is visibly easing the tension between man and animal for the past couple of years.

The man who knew winter was coming: environmentalist Bittu Sahgal and the journey of ‘Sanctuary Asia’

The man who knew winter was coming: environmentalist Bittu Sahgal and the journey of ‘Sanctuary Asia’

We are because of nature, nature isn’t because of us. We currently live with a false sense of superiority over it, as we desecrate ecosystems with merciless urbanisation and crooked production practices. But over the din of destruction, one tenet alone shall ring true – A war against nature is futile. Jo kudrat se takaryega mitti mein mil gayega.

Case Study: TANA TAPI, TAKUM NABUM AND THE GHORA AABHE SOCIETY

TANA TAPI, TAKUM NABUM AND THE GHORA AABHE SOCIETY  Recipient of Habitat Conservation Awards, 2014 - Arunachal Pradesh

The Ghora Aabhe Society consists of reformed hunters and conservationists living in and around Pakke Tiger Reserve, who have become the guardians of wildlife in this landscape. Situated in the state of Arunachal Pradesh, members of the society are known for carrying out ground-level conservation work with communities and governing agencies towards the awareness and conservation of biodiversity. Two of the key people from the society are Tana Tapi and Takum Nabum.

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