Innovative Concepts

Case Study: Sandeep Gurung Sikkim

Armstrong Pame, the first IAS officer from Zemay Tribe of the Naga people, presents the young Naturalist Award to Sandeep Gurung from Sikkim

A writer and green activist, the seeds of Mr. Sandeep Gurung’s green consciousness were in many ways laid down by his parents. Mr. Gurung run Oh My India (OMI), a social group that creates awareness on the importance of reducing, reusing and recycling domestic waste, which has inspired thousands of individuals to change their lifestyles. He carved a niche for himself in the fashion world at a young age and is the owner of Green Gangtok – the first-of-its-kind eco- friendly fashion boutique in Sikkim. Mr.

Case Study: Sandeep Gurung Sikkim

Armstrong Pame, the first IAS officer from Zemay Tribe of the Naga people, presents the young Naturalist Award to Sandeep Gurung from Sikkim

A writer and green activist, the seeds of Mr. Sandeep Gurung’s green consciousness were in many ways laid down by his parents. Mr. Gurung run Oh My India (OMI), a social group that creates awareness on the importance of reducing, reusing and recycling domestic waste, which has inspired thousands of individuals to change their lifestyles. He carved a niche for himself in the fashion world at a young age and is the owner of Green Gangtok – the first-of-its-kind eco- friendly fashion boutique in Sikkim. Mr.

Case Study: Purnima Devi Barman, Assam

Nellie Ahmed Tanweer, founder of the idea ‘Nature as our Classroom’ presents the Green Guru Award to Purnima Devi Barman for preserving the Greater Adjutant Stork in Assam

A guardian for the Greater Adjutant Stork in Assam, Purnima Devi Barman have campaigned relentlessly for the conservation of this rare species, influenced public opinion and boosted the chances of their survival. As a child growing up near the Palababari and Deepor Beel wetlands, Ms. Barman wondered about these birds and later as an adult, she returned to Deepor Beel with Aaranyak, an NGO working on biodiversity conservation and wildlife.

Case Study: Miksak Apal Natural Resource Management Group Meghalaya

Szarita Laitphlang,Secretary and Spokesperson MREGC, honours winner of The Eastern - Himalayan Conservation Award, Miksak Apal Natural Resource Management Group

Formed in 2004-2005, the Miksak Apal Natural Resource Management Group (NaRMG) trains the village community of Selbalgre in natural resource, organisation and financial management with an emphasis on the restoration of the environment along with improvement of livelihoods. Under their aegis, community members have taken over the conservation and management of the 35-hecatre Selbalgre Village Reserve Forest.

Case Study: Hong Village Community, Ziro Arunachal

Rolf von Bueren from LADV, Thailand presents the Naturenomics Award to Hong Village Community from Zero, Arunachal Pradesh

One of the few people in the world who continue to live in harmony with nature, Hong Village Community’s’ methods of sustainable farming and social forestry is without a parallel anywhere in this world. Settled in Ziro, one of the most beautiful Himalayan valleys in India, the Village Community remains proud of their traditional history while maintaining a balance with the changing world. Built on flat lands, the farms where the community practice wet rice cultivation along with pisciculture, is an epitome of efficiency.

TEN YEARS AFTER THE STERN REVIEW

TEN YEARS AFTER THE STERN REVIEW

Nicholas Stern has a background in developmental economics and climate change. He has been supporting the initiative to reduce global per capita emissions to reduce the impact of climate change. He also believes that poverty reduction, sustainability and climate change are intermingled components that affect each other intrinsically.

From loathed to loved: Villagers rally to save Greater Adjutant stork

Greater Adjutants in a nest at the Dadara village nesting colony in Assam, India. Photo by Purnima Barman
  • The Greater Adjutant stork (Leptoptilos dubius) could once be found from India to Southeast Asia in the hundreds of thousands. Long despised and treated as a pest, this giant, ungainly bird is Endangered by habitat lost, with just 1,000 remaining by the 1990s.

Culling wild animals isn't part of the Indian ethos – we can do better to avoid conflict

Culling wild animals isn't part of the Indian ethos – we can do better to avoid conflict

Policy decisions in wildlife are rarely rooted in science and are often a result of political processes. In countries like Norway and North America, with their high quality and quantity of wildlife science, hunting of wild animals is culturally acceptable and carried out for harvesting meat, recreation, tradition and empowerment of rural communities. Culling is also carried out in response to human-wildlife conflict, despite lack of evidence of its efficacy.

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