Habitat

The Story of All of Us

The Story of All of Us
The Story of All of Us

"The Story of All of Us" is a short-film that asks people to look inside their hearts, to unravel the umbilical cord that connects us humans with the forests and every other living being on Earth.

It shares the message of the importance of forests: not only for humans but for the innumerable species of plants and animals that call these forests, home. Miss Universe, Actor Sushmita Sen lends her voice for the film which reiterates that Forests and Wildlife protection and conservation are an intrinsic value of human existence and survival. 

Case Study: JADHAV PAYENG

JADHAV PAYENG receiving the Ecological Restoration Awards, 2013 - Assam

Jadhav ‘Mulai’ Payeng belongs to the ‘Mishing’ tribe (one of the largest ethnic groups of Assam). He used to live in the forest ‘Mulai Kathoni’ at Aruna Chapori, with his wife and three children where his only source of income was selling milk. (He recently moved to his ancestral village in Jorhat District for the sake of his children’s education). ‘Mulai Kathoni’ - the name of the forest was given by the Government of Assam, and it is called rightly as he was the one who helped in creating it.

Elephas Maximus vs Homo Sapien

Dr. Khyne U Mar, John Roberts and Belinda Stewart Cox share their thoughts on captive elephants at EHNF

The history of the world is replete with names of illustrious members of the Asian Elephant or Elephas Maximus family such as -

Organic farms help Thailand welcome cranes lost for 50 years

In this Friday, Nov 4, 2016, photo, animal scientists Tanat Uttaraviset, left, and Natawut Wanna, wear crane suits as they carry a sarus crane to be released into the wild at a wetland acclimating center in Buriram, Thailand. The tallest flying birds in the world, 70 incubator-hatched, hand-fed sarus cranes have been raised and released over the past five years in Thailand’s farm-rich northeast province of Buriram, whooping their startling two-toned song at dawn. (Gemunu Amarasinghe/Associated Press) By Mar

 A fuzzy-headed baby sarus crane hatched on a rural farm this fall offers a glimmer of hope for wildlife conservationists, organic farming advocates and a nation grieving after the death of their beloved king. That’s because this chubby chick named Rice is the first of its auspicious species to survive after hatching in the wild in Thailand in 50 years.

Lessons to be learnt from Emperor Ashoka and Kautilya Asian Elephant Secretariat launched today

The two day Eastern Himalayan Naturenomics Forum organised by the Balipara Foundation had started on 8th November in the College of Veterinary Science at Khanapara wherein discussions, presentations and plenary sessions were held behind the backdrop of the critical biodiversity the Eastern Himalayas. The College of Veterinary Sessions was moderated by Dr. R. N. Goswami, Dean, College of Veterinary Science, Assam Agricultural University and in his welcome address Dr. Goswami stressed on habitat protection over specific species protection and laid concern in the lack of veterinary experts in forest department. Mr Ranjit Barthakur, Founder Trustee, Baliapra Foundation and the Architect of Naturenomics Model in his address highlighted the primary aims and objectives of the forum – nurturing the biodiversity of the Eastern Himalayas of which Notrth Eastern region is a major part and honouring the eco-champions of the year.

Could we set aside half the Earth for nature?

A bald uakari monkey (Cacajao calvus) in the flooded forest of the Amazon in Brazil. The IUCN Red List categorizes this species as vulnerable. Photograph: Alamy

As of today, the only place in the universe where we are certain life exists is on our little home, the third planet from the sun. But also as of today, species on Earth are winking out at rates likely not seen since the demise of the dinosaurs. If we don’t change our ways, we will witness a mass extinction event that will not only leave our world a far more boring and lonely place, but will undercut the very survival of our species. So, what do we do? E.O. Wilson, one of the world’s most respected biologists, has proposed a radical, wild and challenging idea to our species: set aside half of the planet as nature preserves.

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