Environmental Friendly

How Big Banks Are Putting Rain Forests in Peril

Young orphaned orangutans on a climbing expedition with their keeper at International Animal Rescue’s orangutan school in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Credit Kemal Jufri for The New York Times

In early 2015, scientists monitoring satellite images at Global Forest Watch raised the alarm about the destruction of rain forests in Indonesia. Environmental groups raced to the scene in West Kalimantan province, on the island of Borneo, to find a charred wasteland: smoldering fires, orangutans driven from their nests, and signs of an extensive release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. “There was pretty much no forest left,” said Karmele Llano Sánchez, director of the nonprofit International Animal Rescue’s orangutan rescue group, which set out to save the endangered primates. “All the forest had burned.”

Culling wild animals isn't part of the Indian ethos – we can do better to avoid conflict

Culling wild animals isn't part of the Indian ethos – we can do better to avoid conflict

Policy decisions in wildlife are rarely rooted in science and are often a result of political processes. In countries like Norway and North America, with their high quality and quantity of wildlife science, hunting of wild animals is culturally acceptable and carried out for harvesting meat, recreation, tradition and empowerment of rural communities. Culling is also carried out in response to human-wildlife conflict, despite lack of evidence of its efficacy.

The man who knew winter was coming: environmentalist Bittu Sahgal and the journey of ‘Sanctuary Asia’

The man who knew winter was coming: environmentalist Bittu Sahgal and the journey of ‘Sanctuary Asia’

We are because of nature, nature isn’t because of us. We currently live with a false sense of superiority over it, as we desecrate ecosystems with merciless urbanisation and crooked production practices. But over the din of destruction, one tenet alone shall ring true – A war against nature is futile. Jo kudrat se takaryega mitti mein mil gayega.

A day in a Garo village by Balipara Foundation Team

Balipara Foundation team with the ladies of Garo Gaon

On 4th of December 2016, Mr. Ranjit Barthakur along with the BTFF team members experienced a village life of three tribal communities which are Garo, Nissi, and Bodo tribe. The team was first guided to Sengelimari Garo Gaon by Mrs. Eliza Boro, a member of Mahila Shakti Kendra and owner of Saneki at NaturenomicsTM Bazaar. There they met Mrs. Sushila Sangma, widow of a late army officer. The team explored her home garden where they found a large variety of trees including orange, black pepper, pineapple etc.

Case Study: Dr. Tirtha : Life Time Achievement Winner @ BFA 2016

Dr Tirtha Bahadur Shrestha was given the Balipara Foundation Lifetime Service Award for his inimitable conservation work in the Eastern Himalayas, he calls ‘the abode of biodiversity’

Dr. Tirtha was acknowledged by Balipara Foundation with Life Time Achievement Award, 2016

Case Study: B. M. KHAITAN

Mr. R.S. Jhawar (Williamson Magor) receiving the Lifetime Service Award on behalf of Mr. Brij Mohan Khaitan from The Honorable Chief Secretary to Government of Assam -2015

Brij Mohan Khaitan, also known as B. M. Khaitan, is the founder of the B. M. Khaitan Group. He heads McLeod Russel, the world’s largest tea company, and is known for his involvement in philanthropic activities for the welfare of community and wildlife. Mr. Khaitan is an eminent Industrialist and owns the Eveready Industries India, Ltd (EIIL). He is also involved in the manufacture of various metal and chemical products. Mr. Khaitan is also called as the ‘Evergreen Team Man of India’ within the Tea Industry.

Case Study: DASHO PALJOR J. DORJI

DASHO PALJOR J. DORJI Recipient of Lifetime Achievement Awards, 2014 - Bhutan

Called as the Godfather of Conservation in Bhutan, Dasho Paljor J. Dorji has had a distinguished career with the Royal Government of Bhutan, serving three kings in the capacity of Magistrate of Paro District 1969-1972, High Court Judge 1972-1974, acting Chief Justice of Bhutan 1974-1985, Chief Justice of Bhutan 1985-1987, Deputy Minister for Social Services 1988-1991, Ambassador to the United Nations and European capitals 1991-1994, Deputy Minister to the National Environment Commission 1994-1997.

Case Study: ANNE WRIGHT

ANNE WRIGHT Recipient of Lifetime Service Awards, 2013 - Assam & North Bengal

Anne Wright was born the daughter of British ICS Ocer and she spent her childhood in the forests of Central India. She is also the founder trustee of World Wildlife fund for Nature – India, which she helped setup in the late 1960s. She was appointed by the late Prime Minister Indira Gandhi as a member of the Tiger Task Force for Project Tiger in 1970. She then served for 19 years on the Indian Board for Wildlife and was closely involved with the passing of the Wildlife Protection Act.

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