Environmental Friendly

Case Study: Rohit Choudhury, Assam

Bruce Rich, environmental lawyer presents the Green Legal Award to Rohit Choudhury

Using a combination of the Right to Information Act (RTI Act) and litigation before the National Green Tribunal, Mr. Rohit Choudhury has highlighted several violations of law with respect to environmental issues in Assam before the courts over the past decade.

Case Study: Hong Village Community, Ziro Arunachal

Rolf von Bueren from LADV, Thailand presents the Naturenomics Award to Hong Village Community from Zero, Arunachal Pradesh

One of the few people in the world who continue to live in harmony with nature, Hong Village Community’s’ methods of sustainable farming and social forestry is without a parallel anywhere in this world. Settled in Ziro, one of the most beautiful Himalayan valleys in India, the Village Community remains proud of their traditional history while maintaining a balance with the changing world. Built on flat lands, the farms where the community practice wet rice cultivation along with pisciculture, is an epitome of efficiency.

Norway's wolf cull pits sheep farmers against conservationists

Norway has a population of just 68 wolves and conservationists say most off the injuries to sheep are caused by roaming wolves from Swedish packs. Photograph: Roger Strandli Brendhagen

Conservation groups worldwide were astonished to hear of the recent,unprecedented decision to destroy 70% of the Norway’s tiny and endangered population of 68 wolves, the biggest cull for almost a century.But not everyone in Norway is behind the plan. The wildlife protection group Predator Alliance Norway, for example, has campaign posters that talk of wolves as essential for nature, and a tourist attraction for Norway.

TEN YEARS AFTER THE STERN REVIEW

TEN YEARS AFTER THE STERN REVIEW

Nicholas Stern has a background in developmental economics and climate change. He has been supporting the initiative to reduce global per capita emissions to reduce the impact of climate change. He also believes that poverty reduction, sustainability and climate change are intermingled components that affect each other intrinsically.

From loathed to loved: Villagers rally to save Greater Adjutant stork

Greater Adjutants in a nest at the Dadara village nesting colony in Assam, India. Photo by Purnima Barman
  • The Greater Adjutant stork (Leptoptilos dubius) could once be found from India to Southeast Asia in the hundreds of thousands. Long despised and treated as a pest, this giant, ungainly bird is Endangered by habitat lost, with just 1,000 remaining by the 1990s.

Talk Time with Wasbir Hussain: Lisa Mills

Talk Time with Wasbir Hussain: Lisa Mills
Talk Time with Wasbir Hussain: Lisa Mills
Lisa Mills, Elephants on the Line, an Elephant conservationist & educator speaks to Wasbir about the declining numbers of Elephants and the challenges of habitat de-gradation. She speaks about Elephant conservation success through education for the new generation and to provide the best of community & science to give to the Elephants. 
 

Talk Time with Wasbir Hussain: Ranjit Barthakur - EHNF 2016

Talk Time with Wasbir Hussain: Ranjit Barthakur
Talk Time with Wasbir Hussain: Ranjit Barthakur
Talk time with Wasbir Hussain in conversation with Ranjit Barthakur talking about the rich biodiversity of the North East and the creation of business out of nature,which can lead to building a bio-diverse economic nation. He emphasizes on interdependence between nature and economics, the concept of Naturenomics™, pioneered by Balipara Foundation, that creates models & proves that through nature and small community projects we can kick start an economy based on nature. 
 

How Big Banks Are Putting Rain Forests in Peril

Young orphaned orangutans on a climbing expedition with their keeper at International Animal Rescue’s orangutan school in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Credit Kemal Jufri for The New York Times

In early 2015, scientists monitoring satellite images at Global Forest Watch raised the alarm about the destruction of rain forests in Indonesia. Environmental groups raced to the scene in West Kalimantan province, on the island of Borneo, to find a charred wasteland: smoldering fires, orangutans driven from their nests, and signs of an extensive release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. “There was pretty much no forest left,” said Karmele Llano Sánchez, director of the nonprofit International Animal Rescue’s orangutan rescue group, which set out to save the endangered primates. “All the forest had burned.”

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