Endemic Species

Last rhino dies at sanctuary

Rhino translocation to Burachapori wildlife sanctuary in Sonitpur district of Assam has ended in a disaster with the death of its second rhino today. There are no rhinos at Burachapori wildlife sanctuary now. Two female rhinos, a mother and its calf, were translocated from Kaziranga National Park on March 29 to mark a new beginning in the history of Burachapori wildlife sanctuary. In the early 1980s, the sanctuary had more than 70 rhinos.

Action plan for jumbos - Group meet in Guwahati

The Asian Elephant Specialist Group, under the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), will meet in Guwahati after a long gap next month to prepare an action plan for the conservation of Asiatic elephants. The IUCN Species Survival Commission's Asian Elephant Specialist Group is a network of over 60 like-minded specialists from across the globe, concerned with the study, monitoring, management, and conservation of Asian elephants in its range countries.

The studbook of timber elephants of Myanmar with special reference to survivorship analysis - Khyne U Mar

The purpose of the demographic analyses in this study was to calculate the basic life tables to determine the effects of the long-term captivity of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), which are utilized extensively as draught animals, on survival, fecundity and viability. The studbook data were collected from the elephant log books and the annual reports of the Extraction Department, Myanma Timber Enterprise of the Union of Myanmar. We had access to a near-total of the records (n (9600) of elephants captured or born after the year 1875, including 3 070 calving records. It was documented that 32.5 percent of calves born in captivity failed to reach the age of five years. Life table analysis revealed that most mortality occurred before the age of five. Survivorship analysis of adults and sub-adults (more than five years) showed that wild caught elephants and female elephants had significantly higher survival rates (P <0.001) than captive born and male elephants, respectively. A similar analysis was conducted for calves (under five years) and comparisons were made between dam origins and sex. It was revealed that calves born from wild caught (WC) dams had higher survival rates than those born from captive born (CB) dams (P <0.001), while survivorship and sex showed no correlation.

How a 20th-century hunting boom left the Amazon with “empty rivers” and 23 million dead animals

Who could hurt this face?	(Reuters/Bruno Kelly)

The fashion for wild animal skins and furs drove a hunting boom in the Amazon basin through the 20th century. A mass industry sprung up almost overnight and the hides of otters, jaguars or alligator-like caimans were soon being shipped round the world to be turned into coats, hats or accessories. The Amazon rainforest, and the animals that live there, are still feeling the impact today.

Could we set aside half the Earth for nature?

A bald uakari monkey (Cacajao calvus) in the flooded forest of the Amazon in Brazil. The IUCN Red List categorizes this species as vulnerable. Photograph: Alamy

As of today, the only place in the universe where we are certain life exists is on our little home, the third planet from the sun. But also as of today, species on Earth are winking out at rates likely not seen since the demise of the dinosaurs. If we don’t change our ways, we will witness a mass extinction event that will not only leave our world a far more boring and lonely place, but will undercut the very survival of our species. So, what do we do? E.O. Wilson, one of the world’s most respected biologists, has proposed a radical, wild and challenging idea to our species: set aside half of the planet as nature preserves.

Norway's wolf cull pits sheep farmers against conservationists

Norway has a population of just 68 wolves and conservationists say most off the injuries to sheep are caused by roaming wolves from Swedish packs. Photograph: Roger Strandli Brendhagen

The sheep is favoured for its size and large proportion of meat, but is a bad climber and has poor herding and flight instincts, unlike the old short-tail land race, considered the original Norwegian sheep race, prevalent on the west coast, where ironically there are no wolves. Just across the mountain from Lie’s house in Trysil, is the territory of the Slettåsen pack, which has been marked out for a complete cull even though the wolves live within a designated wolf zone.

Endangered species wait 12 years to get on the list

Eastern Prairie Fringed Orchid (Credit: Joshua Mayer/Wikimedia Commons)

The wait time for getting on the endangered species list is on average about 12 years, six times longer than it should be, a new analysis shows. Scientists say the delays could lead to less global biodiversity.

The US Congress enacted the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1973. To receive protection, a species must first be listed as endangered or threatened in a process that is administered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

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