Elephant

Send your monkeys, take our elephants: Nagaland’s offer puts Himachal in fix

The wildlife wing of Himachal had last month sought the help of Arunachal Pradesh, Manipur and Nagaland to ease the problem the 2.07 lakh monkeys pose to its residents and farmlands. (Ilustration by Daljeet Kaur Sandhu)

Himachal Pradesh’s proposal to relocate thousands of simians to three Northeastern states for mitigating its worsening monkey menace has hit an elephantine obstacle with Nagaland offering pachyderms in exchange The wildlife wing of Himachal had last month sought the help of Arunachal Pradesh, Manipur and Nagaland to ease the problem the 2.07 lakh monkeys pose to its residents and farmlands. Principal secretary Tarun Kapoor even held meetings with his counterparts recently.

Wildlife, environment protection in India dates back to Kautilya, Ashoka’s time

Wildlife conservation, particularly protection of elephants, in India dates back to fourth century BC during the time of Kautilya and Chandragupta Maurya, and there were severe penalty for those found guilty of cruelty to animals, US-based environmental attorney and author Bruce Rich said here on Wednesday.

Lessons to be learnt from Emperor Ashoka and Kautilya Asian Elephant Secretariat launched today

The two day Eastern Himalayan Naturenomics Forum organised by the Balipara Foundation had started on 8th November in the College of Veterinary Science at Khanapara wherein discussions, presentations and plenary sessions were held behind the backdrop of the critical biodiversity the Eastern Himalayas. The College of Veterinary Sessions was moderated by Dr. R. N. Goswami, Dean, College of Veterinary Science, Assam Agricultural University and in his welcome address Dr. Goswami stressed on habitat protection over specific species protection and laid concern in the lack of veterinary experts in forest department. Mr Ranjit Barthakur, Founder Trustee, Baliapra Foundation and the Architect of Naturenomics Model in his address highlighted the primary aims and objectives of the forum – nurturing the biodiversity of the Eastern Himalayas of which Notrth Eastern region is a major part and honouring the eco-champions of the year.

World experts to take part in conference on nature, jumbos

 A two-day conference on nature, especially on elephants, will begin from tomorrow with participation of experts from across the world, inclduing the US, UK, Myanmar along with those from India. "This conference is an important event in the calender with many world-famous experts deliberating on the climate and its impact on nature.

Action plan for jumbos - Group meet in Guwahati

The Asian Elephant Specialist Group, under the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), will meet in Guwahati after a long gap next month to prepare an action plan for the conservation of Asiatic elephants. The IUCN Species Survival Commission's Asian Elephant Specialist Group is a network of over 60 like-minded specialists from across the globe, concerned with the study, monitoring, management, and conservation of Asian elephants in its range countries.

The studbook of timber elephants of Myanmar with special reference to survivorship analysis - Khyne U Mar

The purpose of the demographic analyses in this study was to calculate the basic life tables to determine the effects of the long-term captivity of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), which are utilized extensively as draught animals, on survival, fecundity and viability. The studbook data were collected from the elephant log books and the annual reports of the Extraction Department, Myanma Timber Enterprise of the Union of Myanmar. We had access to a near-total of the records (n (9600) of elephants captured or born after the year 1875, including 3 070 calving records. It was documented that 32.5 percent of calves born in captivity failed to reach the age of five years. Life table analysis revealed that most mortality occurred before the age of five. Survivorship analysis of adults and sub-adults (more than five years) showed that wild caught elephants and female elephants had significantly higher survival rates (P <0.001) than captive born and male elephants, respectively. A similar analysis was conducted for calves (under five years) and comparisons were made between dam origins and sex. It was revealed that calves born from wild caught (WC) dams had higher survival rates than those born from captive born (CB) dams (P <0.001), while survivorship and sex showed no correlation.

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