Elephant

Kumki elephants to be deployed to capture rogue

Kumki arrives to capture rogue elephant

Kumki (tamed) elephants are being roped in by authorities to capture a rogue elephant, which has been creating havoc in Madukkarai area on the city outskirts for the last one year. Coimbatore District Collector Archana Patnaik today convened a meeting to discuss the strategy to capture and translocate the rogue elephant.

Eastern Himalayan Naturenomics™ Forum 2016

Eastern Himalayan Naturenomics™ Forum 2016

Successors & Inheritors of the Asian Elephants in the Wild & the Balipara Foundation Awards are proud to present the 2016 edition at Guwahati, Assam, India on 8th & 9th November 2016

Wildlife Migration from Kaziranga to Karbi Anglong Increasing

With migration of wildlife from Kaziranga National Park to the Karbi Anglong forests beyond its southern boundary showing an increasing trend, conservationists have stressed the need for a long-term safety mechanism for the animals.

Mammals of India By Dr. Anwaruddin Chodhury

Ranjit launches book 'Mammals of India' written by Dr. Anwaruddin Choudhury, IAS, on 9th June, 2016 in Guwahati Press Club. India has more than 400 species of mammals. It is the only country in the world to have the Tiger and the Lion. The presence of such a diverse mammalian species in a relatively small area of the globe is significant (c. 8.6% of the total mammalian species in 2.4% of the world’s land area).

A tusk-less future for the Asian Elephant

Picture the Asian elephant without its elegant tusks. Ecological scientists filming the pachyderms for months together at the Kaziranga National Park in the north-east Indian state of Assam say this picture might become a reality in a few thousand years from now. The reasons, they figure, are two-fold. One, tusks are merely ornamental, not of much use to the animal and thus dispensable. And two, poaching pressures are rendering more and more elephants toothless.

Elephant Gardeners

Just as Elephants need their forest, the forest needs them. Dr Blake, researcher with the Mac Planck Institute for Ornithology, describes the elephants as "mega-gardeners". The researcher and his colleagues spent several months camping in the dense forests tracking the elephants. He has found that, during their lumbering treks, forest elephants can vacuum up hundreds of pieces of fruit from under a single tree. 

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