Eco friendly

From loathed to loved: Villagers rally to save Greater Adjutant stork

Greater Adjutants in a nest at the Dadara village nesting colony in Assam, India. Photo by Purnima Barman
  • The Greater Adjutant stork (Leptoptilos dubius) could once be found from India to Southeast Asia in the hundreds of thousands. Long despised and treated as a pest, this giant, ungainly bird is Endangered by habitat lost, with just 1,000 remaining by the 1990s.

Talk Time with Wasbir Hussain: Lisa Mills

Talk Time with Wasbir Hussain: Lisa Mills
Talk Time with Wasbir Hussain: Lisa Mills
Lisa Mills, Elephants on the Line, an Elephant conservationist & educator speaks to Wasbir about the declining numbers of Elephants and the challenges of habitat de-gradation. She speaks about Elephant conservation success through education for the new generation and to provide the best of community & science to give to the Elephants. 
 

Talk Time with Wasbir Hussain: Ranjit Barthakur - EHNF 2016

Talk Time with Wasbir Hussain: Ranjit Barthakur
Talk Time with Wasbir Hussain: Ranjit Barthakur
Talk time with Wasbir Hussain in conversation with Ranjit Barthakur talking about the rich biodiversity of the North East and the creation of business out of nature,which can lead to building a bio-diverse economic nation. He emphasizes on interdependence between nature and economics, the concept of Naturenomics™, pioneered by Balipara Foundation, that creates models & proves that through nature and small community projects we can kick start an economy based on nature. 
 

Case Study: Sendenyu Community Biodiversity & Wildlife Conservation Committee, Kohima Nagaland

Founding Editor of Sanctuary Asia, Bittu Sahgal presents the Annual Balipara Foundation Award to Sendenyu Community Biodiversity and Wildlife Conservation Committee

Alarmed by the rapidly disappearing floral and faunal populations within a span of a generation due to excessive hunting, logging and jhum cultivation, Sendenyu Community Biodiversity & Wildlife Conservation Committee felt the need to take drastic steps to preserve and protect the biological diversity of the Sendenyu region. Conservation efforts and enforcement of rules in the village Protected Area and other community land have today resulted in the return of a diversity of mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians that had once disappeared.

How Big Banks Are Putting Rain Forests in Peril

Young orphaned orangutans on a climbing expedition with their keeper at International Animal Rescue’s orangutan school in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Credit Kemal Jufri for The New York Times

In early 2015, scientists monitoring satellite images at Global Forest Watch raised the alarm about the destruction of rain forests in Indonesia. Environmental groups raced to the scene in West Kalimantan province, on the island of Borneo, to find a charred wasteland: smoldering fires, orangutans driven from their nests, and signs of an extensive release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. “There was pretty much no forest left,” said Karmele Llano Sánchez, director of the nonprofit International Animal Rescue’s orangutan rescue group, which set out to save the endangered primates. “All the forest had burned.”

Culling wild animals isn't part of the Indian ethos – we can do better to avoid conflict

Culling wild animals isn't part of the Indian ethos – we can do better to avoid conflict

Policy decisions in wildlife are rarely rooted in science and are often a result of political processes. In countries like Norway and North America, with their high quality and quantity of wildlife science, hunting of wild animals is culturally acceptable and carried out for harvesting meat, recreation, tradition and empowerment of rural communities. Culling is also carried out in response to human-wildlife conflict, despite lack of evidence of its efficacy.

The man who knew winter was coming: environmentalist Bittu Sahgal and the journey of ‘Sanctuary Asia’

The man who knew winter was coming: environmentalist Bittu Sahgal and the journey of ‘Sanctuary Asia’

We are because of nature, nature isn’t because of us. We currently live with a false sense of superiority over it, as we desecrate ecosystems with merciless urbanisation and crooked production practices. But over the din of destruction, one tenet alone shall ring true – A war against nature is futile. Jo kudrat se takaryega mitti mein mil gayega.

A day in a Garo village by Balipara Foundation Team

Balipara Foundation team with the ladies of Garo Gaon

On 4th of December 2016, Mr. Ranjit Barthakur along with the BTFF team members experienced a village life of three tribal communities which are Garo, Nissi, and Bodo tribe. The team was first guided to Sengelimari Garo Gaon by Mrs. Eliza Boro, a member of Mahila Shakti Kendra and owner of Saneki at NaturenomicsTM Bazaar. There they met Mrs. Sushila Sangma, widow of a late army officer. The team explored her home garden where they found a large variety of trees including orange, black pepper, pineapple etc.

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