Case Study

Case Study: NEIHUNUO SORHIE

Neihunuo receiving the NaturenomicsTM Award in 2014

Neihunuo Sorhie comes from a simple and modest family upbringing. Her father Lt. Duopie-o Sorhie, died when she was very young. She ha¬s two brothers Vozilie and Akhrie-o in the family, for whom she would weave shawls since her young age. Her mother taught her how to weave and by the age of six she was able to weave clothes herself. The weaving was a part of her childhood and culture, and eventually it transcended to being her passion in life.

Case Study:ACHINTYA KUMAR SINHA

Achintya Kumar Sinha receiving the Annual Balipara Foundation Award from Wildlife Conservationist Vivek Menon in 2015

Belonging to Tripura, Achintya has a long list of accomplishments in the eld of sustainable natural resource management where he has intensively worked with rural communities in creating livelihood opportunities. His biggest contribution to Tripura, its local communities and forests has been the initiation of the 1st Joint Forest Management (JFM) of Tripura. Achitya graduated in Physics from Calcutta University in 1970 and he was also an associate of Indian Forest College (AIFC), Dehradun in the year 1975.

Case Study: PANGTI VILLAGE COMMUNITY & FOREST DEPARTMENT OF NAGALAND

Pangti Village Community and Forest Department of Nagaland receiving the Annual Balipara Foundation Awards in 2014

The Pangti Village Community and Forest Department of Nagaland played a major role in the conservation of the Amur Falcon (Falcoamurensis) after the bird had come in news due to rampant and excessive poaching and hunting in Nagaland, during its migratory passing from the North-eastern state of India. The village council consists of villagers oriented towards wildlife conservation in Nagaland.

Case Study: William Oliver

Willliam Oliver studying Pygmy Hogs (Porcula salvania)

PYGMY HOG CONSERVATION PROGRAMME

Banks may chip in to help India increase its forest cover

Banks may chip in to help India increase its forest cover

If the environment ministry has its way, all banks will be asked to join the state and the central governments in their ongoing efforts to increase forest cover in the country. The move will be part of one of the 10 ways, identified by the Centre, to reach India's key climate goal.

The League of Extraordinary Individuals at BFA 2016

The League of Extraordinary Individuals: Winners of Balipara Foundation Awards 2016

The power to make a difference lies within us all. Nothing could demonstrate this fact more clearly than the recipients of this year’s Balipara Foundation Awards – ordinary men and women with extraordinary achievements.

The studbook of timber elephants of Myanmar with special reference to survivorship analysis - Khyne U Mar

The purpose of the demographic analyses in this study was to calculate the basic life tables to determine the effects of the long-term captivity of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), which are utilized extensively as draught animals, on survival, fecundity and viability. The studbook data were collected from the elephant log books and the annual reports of the Extraction Department, Myanma Timber Enterprise of the Union of Myanmar. We had access to a near-total of the records (n (9600) of elephants captured or born after the year 1875, including 3 070 calving records. It was documented that 32.5 percent of calves born in captivity failed to reach the age of five years. Life table analysis revealed that most mortality occurred before the age of five. Survivorship analysis of adults and sub-adults (more than five years) showed that wild caught elephants and female elephants had significantly higher survival rates (P <0.001) than captive born and male elephants, respectively. A similar analysis was conducted for calves (under five years) and comparisons were made between dam origins and sex. It was revealed that calves born from wild caught (WC) dams had higher survival rates than those born from captive born (CB) dams (P <0.001), while survivorship and sex showed no correlation.

Kumki elephants to be deployed to capture rogue

Kumki arrives to capture rogue elephant

Kumki (tamed) elephants are being roped in by authorities to capture a rogue elephant, which has been creating havoc in Madukkarai area on the city outskirts for the last one year. Coimbatore District Collector Archana Patnaik today convened a meeting to discuss the strategy to capture and translocate the rogue elephant.

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