Carbon

Nations sign historic Paris climate deal

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said delegates were signing "a new covenant for the future"
Hollywood actor and campaigner Leonardo DiCaprio also spoke at the ceremony

Amid hope and hype, delegates have finished signing the Paris climate agreement at UN headquarters in New York.

Some 171 countries inked the deal today, a record number for a new international treaty.

About 15 nations, mainly small island states, had already ratified the agreement.

But dozens of other countries were required to take this second step before the pact came into force.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said: "Paris will shape the lives of all future generations in a profound way - it is their future that is at stake."

Week-long forest fire still burning in Bhutan

The fire in Wangdue has cloaked the mountains in smoke
Firefighters crossing the Punatsangchu river
The fire has continued to burn day and night

For the last week, one of the largest forest fires in Bhutan’s recent history has been burning in the Jigme Singye Wangchuck National Park

Tshering Tobgay: Bhutan isn't just carbon neutral -- it's carbon negative

Deep in the Himalayas, on the border between China and India, lies the Kingdom of Bhutan, which has pledged to remain carbon neutral for all time. In this illuminating talk, Bhutan's Prime Minister Tshering Tobgay shares his country's mission to put happiness before economic growth and set a world standard for environmental preservation.

Video Credits Ted

The end of fossil fuels has begun

World leaders at the UN climate talks have just set a landmark goal that can save everything we love! This is what we marched for, what we signed, called, donated, messaged, and hoped for: a brilliant and massive turning point in human history.

Only 25 pc of original habitats have survived in East Himalayas

WWF : While celebrating the discovery of 200 new species between 2009 and 2014, has also expressed concern over depletion of original habitats due to industrial growth, mining and climate change.

Scare in the Subcontinent

Climate change is recognised as a significant man-made global environmental challenge. But the debate at this point is on the extent of it. Recent evidences suggest that the scientific consensus on many issues are debatable.

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