Botany

Described as the "Hero for the Planet" by Time Magazine - Dr. Peter Raven inaugurates the Eastern Himalayan Botanic Ark

Described as the "Hero for the Planet" by Time Magazine - Dr. Peter Raven inaugurates the Eastern Himalayan Botanic Ark
Described as the "Hero for the Planet" by Time Magazine - Dr. Peter Raven inaugurates the Eastern Himalayan Botanic Ark

Dr. Peter Hamilton Raven, Missouri Botanical Garden, is one of the greatest botanists and environmentalists of our time. Dr. Raven through his teachings has sensitized our understanding of the impact on life on Earth influenced by population, affluence and technology. He guides us through tracing history and civilization, development of cities and languages, the beginning of agriculture, 12000 years ago leading to storage of food and battles over it, globalization and fossil fuels impact on climate and by shifting focus from consuming everything around us to preserving and protecting our natural assets for a sustainable future. 

Eastern Himalayan Naturenomics™ Forum 2017

Photo Credit: Jeevan, Courtsey Pixabay

The distinctive richness of the Eastern Himalayas can be attributed to its colorful biodiversity, numerous niche ecosystems, and vibrant communities. Understanding the dynamics, structure, and functioning of these systems adds an enormous complexity to not only their conservation and restoration, but also in engaging stakeholders and finding innovative long-term solutions.

Eastern Himalayan Botanic Ark to participate in Who’s Who session, YETI, 2017

Local people selling wild food plants

Young Ecologists Talk and Interact, YETI is a unique gathering of ecology students organised entirely by students (

North East India: The unique biodiversity hotspot with rich avifauna

A Great Indian Hornbill at the Nagaland

The North Eastern (NE) region of the India is a biodiversity hotspot and represents one of the highest avian biodiversity of the Indian subcontinent. The region is ecologically represented by the Eastern Himalayan biome and is rich in a number of endemic flora and fauna. Several avian species inhabiting this unique ecosystem are not found or reported anywhere else in the world.

Case Study: Robin Naiding Karbi Anglong, Assam

Rolf von Bueren, LADV, Thailand presents the Food for Future Award to Robin Naiding from Karbi Anglong, Assam

Realising the importance of natural resource management, Mr. Robin Naiding have encouraged and sensitised the village community of Bagadima comprising 42 households in Assam to create less pressure on forest cover and make the best use of land and its resources in a sustainable manner. He have promoted horticulture crops such as litchi, mango, banana, and parkia in his village with organic management of soil fertility and used cover crops to reduce weed growth and soil erosion. Under the leadership of Mr.

Culling wild animals isn't part of the Indian ethos – we can do better to avoid conflict

Culling wild animals isn't part of the Indian ethos – we can do better to avoid conflict

Policy decisions in wildlife are rarely rooted in science and are often a result of political processes. In countries like Norway and North America, with their high quality and quantity of wildlife science, hunting of wild animals is culturally acceptable and carried out for harvesting meat, recreation, tradition and empowerment of rural communities. Culling is also carried out in response to human-wildlife conflict, despite lack of evidence of its efficacy.

The man who knew winter was coming: environmentalist Bittu Sahgal and the journey of ‘Sanctuary Asia’

The man who knew winter was coming: environmentalist Bittu Sahgal and the journey of ‘Sanctuary Asia’

We are because of nature, nature isn’t because of us. We currently live with a false sense of superiority over it, as we desecrate ecosystems with merciless urbanisation and crooked production practices. But over the din of destruction, one tenet alone shall ring true – A war against nature is futile. Jo kudrat se takaryega mitti mein mil gayega.

A day in a Garo village by Balipara Foundation Team

Balipara Foundation team with the ladies of Garo Gaon

On 4th of December 2016, Mr. Ranjit Barthakur along with the BTFF team members experienced a village life of three tribal communities which are Garo, Nissi, and Bodo tribe. The team was first guided to Sengelimari Garo Gaon by Mrs. Eliza Boro, a member of Mahila Shakti Kendra and owner of Saneki at NaturenomicsTM Bazaar. There they met Mrs. Sushila Sangma, widow of a late army officer. The team explored her home garden where they found a large variety of trees including orange, black pepper, pineapple etc.

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