Biodiversity

Case Study: PANGTI VILLAGE COMMUNITY & FOREST DEPARTMENT OF NAGALAND

Pangti Village Community and Forest Department of Nagaland receiving the Annual Balipara Foundation Awards in 2014

The Pangti Village Community and Forest Department of Nagaland played a major role in the conservation of the Amur Falcon (Falcoamurensis) after the bird had come in news due to rampant and excessive poaching and hunting in Nagaland, during its migratory passing from the North-eastern state of India. The village council consists of villagers oriented towards wildlife conservation in Nagaland.

Case Study: William Oliver

Willliam Oliver studying Pygmy Hogs (Porcula salvania)

PYGMY HOG CONSERVATION PROGRAMME

Eastern Himalayan Naturnomics™ Forum 2016

photo from the captive breeding session of Eastern Himalayan Naturnomics™ Forum 2016

Knowledge is not confined to books or academia alone – one can learn from years of observation and experience too. Three local Botanists from Balipara, Assam, whose great knowledge of Botany was gained through decades of practical experience and not through formal education, bear testimony to this fact.

Lessons to be learnt from Emperor Ashoka and Kautilya Asian Elephant Secretariat launched today

The two day Eastern Himalayan Naturenomics Forum organised by the Balipara Foundation had started on 8th November in the College of Veterinary Science at Khanapara wherein discussions, presentations and plenary sessions were held behind the backdrop of the critical biodiversity the Eastern Himalayas. The College of Veterinary Sessions was moderated by Dr. R. N. Goswami, Dean, College of Veterinary Science, Assam Agricultural University and in his welcome address Dr. Goswami stressed on habitat protection over specific species protection and laid concern in the lack of veterinary experts in forest department. Mr Ranjit Barthakur, Founder Trustee, Baliapra Foundation and the Architect of Naturenomics Model in his address highlighted the primary aims and objectives of the forum – nurturing the biodiversity of the Eastern Himalayas of which Notrth Eastern region is a major part and honouring the eco-champions of the year.

Exploration and Discovery in the Last Shangri-La on Earth- Eastern Himalayas (Eastern Nepal, Bhutan & North East India)

The Himalaya – the abode of Gods, the land of snow, and the last Shangri La on Earth – is full of life. Designated as a global biodiversity hotspot, the region supports an extraordinarily high level of unique biodiversity. Being at the crossroads of historic and prehistoric trade routes and cultural diffusion, the Himalaya harbours hundreds of different ethnic communities and their associated languages and cultures, and its landscapes are sacred to several of the world’s major religions After the two poles, the Himalaya holds the highest amount of ice in its glaciers.

How a 20th-century hunting boom left the Amazon with “empty rivers” and 23 million dead animals

Who could hurt this face?	(Reuters/Bruno Kelly)

The fashion for wild animal skins and furs drove a hunting boom in the Amazon basin through the 20th century. A mass industry sprung up almost overnight and the hides of otters, jaguars or alligator-like caimans were soon being shipped round the world to be turned into coats, hats or accessories. The Amazon rainforest, and the animals that live there, are still feeling the impact today.

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