All Wild Species

Case Study: JADHAV PAYENG

JADHAV PAYENG receiving the Ecological Restoration Awards, 2013 - Assam

Jadhav ‘Mulai’ Payeng belongs to the ‘Mishing’ tribe (one of the largest ethnic groups of Assam). He used to live in the forest ‘Mulai Kathoni’ at Aruna Chapori, with his wife and three children where his only source of income was selling milk. (He recently moved to his ancestral village in Jorhat District for the sake of his children’s education). ‘Mulai Kathoni’ - the name of the forest was given by the Government of Assam, and it is called rightly as he was the one who helped in creating it.

Case Study: PANCHAN LAKHAR COMMUNITY CONSERVED AREA MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE (PLACCAMC)

 PANCHAN LAKHAR COMMUNITY CONSERVED AREA MANAGEMENT  COMMITTEE (PLACCAMC) Recipient of Nature Conservancy Awards, 2015 - Arunachal Pradesh

Local communities that inhabit villages around Protected Areas are one of the foremost stakeholders for conserving, due to their dependence on it. Their involvement in its conservation can help both nature and community to grow as one. The villagers of Kharman and Kyalegteng in Arunachal Pradesh were inspired by the idea of Community Conserved Area and approached Tata Trusts and WWF – India for technical and nancial support to demarcate 85 km² of unclassed State Forest land as the Pangchen Lakhar Community Conserved Area (PLACCA).

Case Study: MUNJALI TOKBIPI

MUNJALI TOKBIPI receiving the Young Naturalist Awards, 2013 - Assam

A member of the Karbi Community, Munjali has been working relentlessly to protect wildlife and green cover in the Karbi-Anglong landscape along with local communities, for which she was awarded the Young Naturalist Award by Balipara Foundation in the year 2013when she was 27 years old. Munjali’s father works as a government employee and her mother is a housewife, and they both supported her on her choice to take an upbeat career path and work towards wildlife conservation.

Case Study: BIODIVERSITY AND NATURE CONSERVATION NETWORK (BIOCONE)

BIOCONE receiving the Green Guru Award in 2015

Since 2010, the year of its inception, Biodiversity and Nature Conservation Network (BIOCONE) NGO, has been growing in the eld of nature conservation in Mizoram. The organization is working towards raising awareness among local communities regarding the importance of biodiversity and ecological balance in India, specically focusing Mizoram. The organization is also involved in wildlife documentation and exploration of Northeast India, particularly in Mizoram.

Case Study: DR. ANWARUDDIN CHOUDHURY

Dr. Anwaruddin, releasing the book on 'Mammals of India', in collaboration with Balipara Foundation

Dr. Anwaruddin Choudhury is an ornithologist, mammologist, artist, civil servant, photographer and an author of several books on wildlife, notably known for writing a book on ‘Mammals of India’ in 2016. Dr. Choudhury received his Bachelor of Arts degree with Honours in Geography from B. Borooah College, Guwahati in 1981. He then went on to Guwahati University to obtain his Master of Arts Degree in Geography in 1985. He obtained his Ph.D.

Wildlife, environment protection in India dates back to Kautilya, Ashoka’s time

Wildlife conservation, particularly protection of elephants, in India dates back to fourth century BC during the time of Kautilya and Chandragupta Maurya, and there were severe penalty for those found guilty of cruelty to animals, US-based environmental attorney and author Bruce Rich said here on Wednesday.

World on track to lose two-thirds of wild animals by 2020, major report warns

A victim of poachers in Kenya: elephants are among the species most impacted by humans, the WWF report found. Photograph: imageBROKER/REX/Shutterstock

Living Planet Index shows vertebrate populations are set to decline by 67% on 1970 levels unless urgent action is taken to reduce humanity’s impact The number of wild animals living on Earth is set to fall by two-thirds by 2020, according to a new report, part of a mass extinction that is destroying the natural world upon which humanity depends. The analysis, the most comprehensive to date, indicates that animal populations plummeted by 58% between 1970 and 2012, with losses on track to reach 67% by 2020.

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