All Wild Species

How Big Banks Are Putting Rain Forests in Peril

Young orphaned orangutans on a climbing expedition with their keeper at International Animal Rescue’s orangutan school in West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Credit Kemal Jufri for The New York Times

In early 2015, scientists monitoring satellite images at Global Forest Watch raised the alarm about the destruction of rain forests in Indonesia. Environmental groups raced to the scene in West Kalimantan province, on the island of Borneo, to find a charred wasteland: smoldering fires, orangutans driven from their nests, and signs of an extensive release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. “There was pretty much no forest left,” said Karmele Llano Sánchez, director of the nonprofit International Animal Rescue’s orangutan rescue group, which set out to save the endangered primates. “All the forest had burned.”

Culling wild animals isn't part of the Indian ethos – we can do better to avoid conflict

Culling wild animals isn't part of the Indian ethos – we can do better to avoid conflict

Policy decisions in wildlife are rarely rooted in science and are often a result of political processes. In countries like Norway and North America, with their high quality and quantity of wildlife science, hunting of wild animals is culturally acceptable and carried out for harvesting meat, recreation, tradition and empowerment of rural communities. Culling is also carried out in response to human-wildlife conflict, despite lack of evidence of its efficacy.

Forest Department Using Drone To Track Wild Tiger

Assam forest department is taking the help of an Army drone to track the route of a tiger which created panic Tezpur in Sonitpur district. The Misamari Army base used the drone to find out the probable location of the tiger which was missing after its pug mark was found at Kolibari Tapu on Wednesday night, chief Conservator of Forest, Northern Range, P Shiv Kumar told PTI.

The man who knew winter was coming: environmentalist Bittu Sahgal and the journey of ‘Sanctuary Asia’

The man who knew winter was coming: environmentalist Bittu Sahgal and the journey of ‘Sanctuary Asia’

We are because of nature, nature isn’t because of us. We currently live with a false sense of superiority over it, as we desecrate ecosystems with merciless urbanisation and crooked production practices. But over the din of destruction, one tenet alone shall ring true – A war against nature is futile. Jo kudrat se takaryega mitti mein mil gayega.

The Art of Beeing - California

British artist Louis Masai travels across the USA in Autumn 2016 to begin his attempt to tackle species extinction through art. It is one of the most ambitious mural projects of its kind to date, with 20 murals coming to 12 cities in just two months, reflecting the fast escalating extinction crisis.

Case Study: B. M. KHAITAN

Mr. R.S. Jhawar (Williamson Magor) receiving the Lifetime Service Award on behalf of Mr. Brij Mohan Khaitan from The Honorable Chief Secretary to Government of Assam -2015

Brij Mohan Khaitan, also known as B. M. Khaitan, is the founder of the B. M. Khaitan Group. He heads McLeod Russel, the world’s largest tea company, and is known for his involvement in philanthropic activities for the welfare of community and wildlife. Mr. Khaitan is an eminent Industrialist and owns the Eveready Industries India, Ltd (EIIL). He is also involved in the manufacture of various metal and chemical products. Mr. Khaitan is also called as the ‘Evergreen Team Man of India’ within the Tea Industry.

Case Study: NAMITA KALITA

NAMITA KALITA Recipient of Special Forest Guard Awards, 2015 - Assam

Posted at Ghorakati Range under Kaziranga National Park, Namita has been instrumental in resolving various dicult situations arising within the park. Her passion and dedication for wildlife has led to her taking immense initiative in her work. She is also known to have great leadership qualities; one of the examples of her exemplary work was during the oods that hit Kaziranga in 2014, wherein she tirelessly engaged in rescue operations of wild animals.

Case Study: DR. KASHMIRA KAKATI

DR. KASHMIRA KAKATI receiving the Ecological Restoration Awards, 2014 - Assam

Born and brought up in Assam, Dr. Kashmira Kakati is a Wildlife Biologist working towards safeguarding a patch of 500 km² of rainforest in Jeypore-Dehing lowlands which includes Dehing Patkai Wildlife Sanctuary in Assam. She completed her post-graduation from Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun and her doctoral studies from Cambridge University on ‘The Impact of Forest Fragmentation on Hoolock Gibbons in Assam’. Kashmira then took a break between 2002 and 2007 to raise her family with fellow Elephant Biologist Husband, Dr. Christy Williams.

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