Celebrating World Plantation Day with the future of the Eastern Himalayas- 21 st March ‘18 | Balipara Foundation

Celebrating World Plantation Day with the future of the Eastern Himalayas- 21 st March ‘18

Sowing seeds for tomorrow at the Eastern Himalayan Botanic Ark
“Even if I knew that tomorrow the world would go to pieces, I would still plant my apple tree.” ― Martin Luther

 

Striving towards a green future, at Balipara Foundation, we are sowing seeds for tomorrow at the Eastern Himalayan Botanic Ark. Recognizing the key role that the future generation plays in arching the way towards a “Green India” and in order to inculcate a love for nature, Balipara Foundation celebrated World Plantation Day today with children of K. V Lokra, Lokra L.P.School, Buragaon M.E School and Buragaon High School.

Planting trees connects children with nature and shows them that their hard work and care can make a difference in the world. It inspires them to discover the natural world and nurture it. Along with guiding them on actions that they can take to help protect and preserve the environment.

The day began with a message on plant food, trees, berries and edible flowers. The children were excited to know about the different fruits and nuts that they eat, that come from the trees. They appreciate the taste, beauty and healthy living. They understand the difference uses of trees and its importance in the ecosystem. How it affects the climate and provides shelter to the wildlife in the region. 

World Planation Day, celebrated every year on 21st March is a special event, celebrated around the globe. It’s a day that helps us remember that our gardens are beautiful and delicious. And reminds us of the arrival of spring and to start thinking about gardening and growing healthy and nutritious food.

Mr. Hardev Singh and Mr. Anup Mehra guided the students on the active role that they can play in helping green their schools by teaming with their teachers, administrators, and parents to plant trees on their school property. This was followed by the donation of 150 fruit saplings with a variety of Guava (Psidium guajava), Elephant apple (Dillenia indica), Hilika (Terminalia chebula), Indian Gooseberry (Phyllanthus emblica), Indian Olive (Elaeocarpus serratus) to these schools.

The children were explained how trees in a school yard improves air quality and can reduce temperatures in warm climates by 10°F. They provide shade in hot temperatures and new signs of life. They are a small environmental investment that will pay dividends for decades to come. 

The Planation Drive is an opportunity for children to connect with nature in a fun and practical way to learn about trees and the role they play in the health of the environment and the community. We are looking forward to plant more trees and keep our area clean and green.

Details of the plant donated

School

No. of saplings

No. of Male students

No. of Female students

No. of teachers

No. of participants

K.V lokra

50

15

0

10

25

Buragaon M.E school

25

0

8

10

18

Buragaon High School

25

7

3

1

11

lokra lp school

50

17

33

1

51

Total

150

 

 

105

 

 

 

Plant name

Scientific name

Economic importance

 

 

Guava

 

 

Psidium guajava

 

 

Leaves used as an astringent for bowel troubles; also used for tanning. Decoction of bark given in diarrhoea. Fruits tonic, cooling, and laxative, useful in colic and bleeding gums.

 

 

Elephant apple

 

 

Dillenia indica

 

 

The fruit pulp is bitter sour and used in Indian cuisine in curries, jam and jellies

 

 

Hilika

 

 

Terminalia chebula

 

 

The fruit has been used in the manufacture of black salt. . It has a distinctive smoky flavour and is a main ingredient of the spice blend known as chat masala

 

 

Indian Gooseberry

 

 

Phyllanthus emblica

 

Fruit sour and astringent, cooling, diuretic, laxative, eaten raw or cooked, also pickled, a rich source of vitamin C ; containing as much vitamin C a orange juice. Seeds yield a fixed oil. Fruits, bark and leaves are rich in tannin.

 

 

 

Indian Olive

 

 

Elaeocarpus serratus

 

 

The fruit has nutritive and medicinal values.

 

 

Nature Video Highlight

The Eastern Himalayan Botanical Ark is a first of its kind in the Eastern Himalayas. The Ark seeks to become the centre for preservation and restoration of the biodiversity through education, experimentation and research.
The Eastern Himalayan Botanical Ark is a first of its kind in the Eastern Himalayas. The Ark seeks to become the centre for preservation and restoration of the biodiversity through education, experimentation and research.
Enamored by plant stories, captivated by the mysteries of their origin and etymology, and in a constant move to explore exotic plant species – Scott McMahan, Manager of International Plant Exploration Program, Atlanta Botanical Garden, is happy when referred to as a seed collector than a plant collector.
Enamored by plant stories, captivated by the mysteries of their origin and etymology, and in a constant move to explore exotic plant species – Scott McMahan, Manager of International Plant Exploration Program, Atlanta Botanical Garden, is happy when referred to as a seed collector than a plant collector.
Enamored by plant stories, captivated by the mysteries of their origin and etymology – Scott McMahan, Manager of International Plant Exploration Program, Atlanta Botanical Garden, is happy when referred to as a seed collector than a plant collector.
Enamored by plant stories, captivated by the mysteries of their origin and etymology – Scott McMahan, Manager of International Plant Exploration Program, Atlanta Botanical Garden, is happy when referred to as a seed collector than a plant collector.
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